A View of the Shetland Islands from the ferry

A View of the Shetland Islands from the ferry

Whoever said the Faro Islands are worth a visit were not kidding, it is beautiful here, even when it rains.

The view from our tent

The view from our tent

We are camped overlooking the most wonderful view of one of the smaller islands, just a 10 minute walk from the throbbing heart of Torshavn – ok, its more like a Cornish seaside town, but we did finally find a supermarket to ensure we could eat while we stay here.  There was a good range of fruit and veg and it was not as exorbitantly expensive as I thought it might be. The centre of the town has a nice range of fashion and high end craft shops, not in the least bit tacky (if you ignore all the puffin toys).  (We did find the rest of Torshavn later)

Monday was a lovely sunny day but the evening got pretty chilly- we managed to cook outside but it was 10 degrees C by the time we went to bed.

dinner in the Faroes

Driving around the Faroe Islands presents its own challenges.  The hills seem to be permanently swathed in low cloud and, although the road surfaces are not bad, there are not many road signs.  We finally managed to find the route to the north of Streymoy after driving into Torshavn twice and following a bus around a housing estate.  Seeing as there are so few roads round here, I think my navigation will have to improve before we get to Norway.  We went for a boat trip from a little harbour called Vestmanna on Tuesday from, one of the best I have ever been on.  It was truly, jaw-droopingly thrilling.

Bird cliffs in the Faro Islands

Bird cliffs in the Faro Islands

We passed 1000 ft high cliffs that gave me the feeling of being in a cathedral, through caves just bigger than the boat and the skill of the skipper was outstanding.

great navigation

Elephant Rock

This rock is called the Elephant, which they used to climb to capture puffins.  The good news is that they stopped doing this 4 years ago, due to sadly reduced numbers.  Yeh, no chance of pickled puffin, then.  Watching the puffins feeding was delightful; I have never seen them before and they seem to have the aerodynamic properties of a brick.  They flutter like mad and dip repeatedly into the water.

Not the steepest place where they herd sheep.

Not the steepest place where they herd sheep.

We watched the locals herding sheep along cliffs so steep that I would not consider even walking along them.  They apparently have 24 sheep on one part and it takes 24 men to round them up and haul them over to the other side with ropes.  It is not an easy life here and it must be even more difficult in the winter when the boats struggle to get through.

We catch the ferry to Iceland this evening……

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